Onboard Camera

Thanks to my friends at the Milwaukee N’ Southeastern for spending some time this weekend taking onboard footage of the FCFL. This video starts as we exit southwest staging, crosses the Benjamin Henry River, rolls through Herbst Junction, passes the Salvation Point Yard, then skirts Many Lost Ways National Park and crosses the high bridge before coasting into northeast staging. It’s a whole new way to see the layout.

I’m a novice video editor so forgive the amateur treatment. To save time I trimmed out the staging yards and long tunnels. I wasn’t able to trim out the giant people wandering about trackside. See anyone you know?

What’s in the bag?

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A solitary backpacker waits for the train at Herbst Junction after a few days of wilderness hiking. His bedroll and backpack – crafted from bits of Play-Doh – complete the scene.

Very few of the N-scale figures I’ve encountered seem to be carrying anything. That’s a problem when your layout is focused on a National Park and a tourist-heavy town on the edge of the desert. Visit your favorite rail depot, outdoor destination or vacation spot and you’ll see people hauling all kinds of gear – backpacks, roll-aboard suitcases, duffel bags, sleeping bags, and more backpacks. The factory options for this kind of luggage are limited, and what is available is spendy.

What’s a modeler to do?

Get out the Play-Doh.

I got playing with some bits of the stuff during a recent sculpting session with The Superintendent. After a few minutes with a toothpick, a steady hand and a scale rule I had crafted fashionable bags for passengers and shoppers, as well as rugged gear for backpackers.

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A scale rule helps keep the size of the sculpted luggage in check. These Play-Doh pieces were dry after about 24 hours.

It takes about 24 hours for Play-Doh sculptures this size to dry. I brush a coat of Tamiya acrylic paint over each piece, then highlight pockets and edges with a contrasting color. I glue backpacks to the backs of a figures with CA and paint straps on with a fine brush.

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Highlights with contrasting colors along the edges and pockets give the luggage dimension.

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This tourist looks much more authentic carrying a backpack.

Pieces stacked on the ground add nice detail to any scene, from station platforms to the beach.

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A rested tourist watches the luggage while his

wife does some last minute shopping. They’ll board the next train east, toward home.

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The cool water of the Benjamin-Henry Reservoir were so inviting, this bather didn’t bother to unroll his beach blanket before wading in.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have people on your layout, are they traveling a little too light?